The Christmas Tree Is Still Up At Home. And It’s Glorious.

Do you need another basic snowflake on your tree? No.

Do you need another basic snowflake on your tree? No.

So, full disclosure: It’s Jan 17, and the Christmas tree is still up at home.

We’re extending the Christmas feels because… why not?

Let’s face it. One little red date on the calendar for merry-making seems, erm, ┬ápaltry.

Behold, the best living room lamp ever.

Behold, the best living room lamp ever.

I remember handpicking the tree in November. She’s tall, pretty, and pert. And definitely more festive than any other living room lamp I’ve seen.

She’s our first tree. In our first home. And she stands there as a warm symbol of wholeness.

I water her every other day. She is a thirsty one. She looks good with all the ornaments we bought her – ice-cream cones, scooters, little ginger bread men.

Yes, I hung the Ginger Bread Man on the tree and I felt nothing.

Yes, I hung the Ginger Bread Man on the tree and it felt good.

Her leafy bristles are a deep green, and the fresh, forest-y scent she gives off is like morning perfume. Invigorating.

When we come home, we’re like, “Hey, it’s Christmas again!” And we do a little dance like no one’s watching. (There was really no one watching.)

 

Christmas all day, every day, in January.

Christmas all day, every day, in January.

When friends started chucking their trees a few days after Christmas, I was like, “Why, is tree dying?”

And they would give a multitude of reasons along the lines of, “Christmas is over, there’s no room for the tree,” or, “Nobody leaves the tree up for so long”, or, “We need to make room for Chinese New Year decorations.”

What if you weren’t allowed to live past your second birthday, just because it wasn’t the thing to do?

This bike has bicycle petals. Hur hur.

This bike has bicycle petals. Hur hur.

Isn’t a Christmas tree basically a pine tree that capitalists hijacked to pimp out once a year to encourage people to spend more money on things they don’t need?

Well, Christmas is over, and this sturdy pine tree can get back to her day job of beautifying any place she stands in.

PROS and CONS of Keeping The Christmas Tree

PROS:

  1. She fills the house with the lovely smell of pine. #realtalk
  2. We come home, and it still feels like Christmas. It’s a lovely feeling, especially on Mondays.
  3. It’s the best place to drape fairy lights. Everything is better with fairy lights.
  4. Some people have dogs/cats to help unwind. I just turn her on.
  5. The fairy lights are more interesting than locally produced TV shows. #UhHUH

CONS:

  1. Can’t think of one.